The Pains of Being Pure at Heart

The Pains of Being Pure at Heart

Frankie Rose, Ablebody

Wed, June 14, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Sinclair

Cambridge, MA

$17 advance / $19 day of show

This event is all ages

The Sinclair is general admission standing room only. Tickets available at AXS.COM, or by phone at 855-482-2090. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at The Sinclair Box office Wednesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM. Please note: box office is cash only.

The Pains of Being Pure at Heart
The Pains of Being Pure at Heart
Days of Abandon, the long-awaited third record from New York's The Pains of Being Pure at Heart finds the band focusing on what's always set them apart from their peers – songwriting. After two critically-acclaimed records (The New York Times, Pitchfork, The Guardian, Rolling Stone, Spin) that demonstrated the group's ability to shift musical registers from bedroom pop daydreams to Alternative Nation anthems, the band is poised to share a new vision of gilded pop idealism. Gliding along on bright, sleek guitars and light, skipping percussion. Abandon is big-hearted and tonic. From the crystalline confessional of "Art Smock" to the prom-in-heaven ready "Beautiful You," this rich and ever-striving sound serves as the perfect backdrop to showcase the renewed emotional depth and candor of Kip Berman's lyricism.

Produced by Andy Savours (My Bloody Valentine, Patrick Wolf, Cloud Boat) and mixed by Charlie Hugall (Swim Deep, Florence And the Machine). Abandon is a bright and refreshing about-face from the roar and clamor that defined the group's last record, the Flood-and-Alan Moulder helmed Belong. "I didn't want to make Belonger," Berman says. "This album was a chance to push beyond that album's universal style of songwriting to something that was far more personal, more in keeping with my original ideals. I wanted the music to be joyful and full of light, even if the subjects were often dark.

Where their debut stuck to a monochrome playbook of indiepop classics and their follow up was a wide-eyed paean to the 90s titans of American rock, Abandon is the Pains at their most sonically and emotionally complete. "Eurydice" hurtles forward like something out of the early House of Love catalog, guitar arpeggios glinting like dew on morning grass. The song sounds as triumphant as it is tragic, detailing an unresolvable loss. "Massokissed" strolls with the ease and assurance of vintage Aztec Camera, though its twisted desire and mordant wit ("a constant aversion to forgo perversion / beat up covertly in places they can't see") tempers any sense that this love is not wrong. "Kelly" is one dizzy pirouette, matching both the grace and sugary melodies of prime Saint Etienne with hopes for a love that likes "filthy films and swill" and rejects "quotes as jokes and coke." Like "Life After Life," it's sung by Jen Goma from A Sunny Day in Glasgow, and her bright, lively voice proves the perfect conduit for Berman's pop savvy.

The record's title — a nod toward Elena Ferrante's celebrated 2002 novel – hints at both the freedom and the fear that comes with solitude. While The Pains of Being Pure at Heart has always been centered on Berman's songwriting, the amicable departure of three bandmates since the release of Belong allowed for new opportunities for growth and collaborations. The soaring vocals of Jen Goma are featured prominently throughout and help deliver on the pop promise the band has long aspired to. Likewise, multi-instrumentalist Kelly Pratt's (Beirut, David Byrne) horn arrangements on "Kelly," "Simple and Sure," "Life After Life" and "The Asp at My Chest" bring a newfound sophistication. No longer content to simply be "loud" or "soft," Abandon is a record that revels in nuance and grace,

"I wanted the album to be powerful without being loud. Simply stepping on a fuzz pedal every 14 seconds felt like a crutch, though a pretty cool sounding crutch. I didn't want to hide these songs behind walls of distortion or elaborate studio wizardry." The result is a record that is as confident as it is cathartic.

"Music always says the things we can't say in conversation. So it feels hopeless to say why these songs feel more honest and vivid to me. But for the first time in a while, I feel the same sense of possibility I felt when I started the band."
Frankie Rose
Frankie Rose
After putting in time with Vivian Girls (serving as the band's drummer and writing "Where Do You Run To," a highlight of their first album), Crystal Stilts, and the Dum Dum Girls, Brooklyn-based noise pop drummer/vocalist Frankie Rose decided to work on her own material -- a series of luminous, reverb-slicked indie pop tunes influenced by Talulah Gosh, Black Tambourine, and My Bloody Valentine. Rose released a solo single, "Thee Only One," on Slumberland Records in 2009, and teamed up with bassist Caroline Yes!, drummer Kate Ryan, and guitarist Margot Bianca soon after to form Frankie Rose & the Outs. The newly formed band's self-titled debut full-length was released on Slumberland Records in the fall of 2010. For her next album, 2012's Interstellar, Rose ditched the Outs and made a solo album that also left behind the noise pop in favor of a slick, new wave-influenced sound. Helping out on the album was Le Chev, a member of Fischerspooner and a well-regarded remixer (Lemonade, Narcisse, and Rose's song "Candy"). For her next record, Rose moved over to Fat Possum and working with producer Micheal Cheever, expanded her sonic palette by adding a string section to some tracks. Frankie Rose's LP3 will be out later this year.
Ablebody
Ablebody
Ablebody is an LA-based duo comprised of identical twins Christoph and Anton Hochheim (members of The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart + The Depreciation Guild). They've been quietly releasing music under this moniker since 2013, self-releasing an EP and 7″ single, crafting remixes and demoing original material as well as a myriad of covers.

Drawing from the raw grandeur of the 60's, the melodicism of soft 70s pop and the sophisticated side of romantic 80s synth pop, Ablebody stand suspended between decades; students of the past but far from retro fetishists. Their musical prowess is evident but the songwriting remains tastefully direct at all times, with arrangements that bend and move in surprising ways but tastefully blanket the overarching sentiment of the songs in a way that we rarely hear in this decade.

The duo have recently taken their sound from the bedroom to the studio, working with producer/engineer Kenny Gilmore (Ariel Pink's Haunted Graffiti) to craft songs with a more visceral edge than they've explored in the past. Daniel Rosenbaum (Pomar) and Jordan Sabolick (Mt. Ossa) have joined the duo to help bring the songs to life and add new dimension to the live dynamic.

Their debut full length record 'Adult Contemporaries' will be released by Lolipop Records onOctober 14.
Venue Information:
The Sinclair
52 Church St
Cambridge, MA, 02138