Good Old War

Good Old War

Twin Bandit

Fri, August 4, 2017

Doors: 10:00 pm / Show: 10:30 pm

Great Scott

Allston, MA

This event is 21 and over

Tickets available at AXS.COM, or by phone at 855-482-2090. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at the Great Scott Box Office seven days a week 12PM-1AM, or at The Sinclair Box Office (Cambridge, MA) Wednesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM. Please note: box offices are cash only.

Good Old War
Good Old War
Keith GOODwin – Vocals/Guitar/Keyboard
Tim ArnOLD – Vocals/drums/Accordion
Dan SchWARtz – Vocals/Guitar

Over the past three years, indie-folk trio Good Old War has captivated countless audiences with their acoustic-driven, sing-along-inspiring live performances. Now, with the release of their third full-length record Come Back as Rain (out now on Sargent House), the Philadelphia-based band harnesses the high-spirited simplicity that makes their shows so unforgettable. Like Only Way To Be Alone (Good Old War's 2008 debut) and their 2010 self-titled sophomore effort, Come Back as Rain showcases the delicately textured melodies and multipart harmonies that have become the band's signature.

Once again revealing their penchant for infectious folk-pop, Good Old War this time sharpens their sound by infusing Come Back as Rain with the same joyful passion they've ceaselessly brought to the stage.

Recorded in spring 2011 at Another Recording Company (the Omaha studio owned by Mike Mogis from Bright Eyes), Come Back as Rain finds the band reuniting with producer Jason Cupp. Despite taking to a far less rustic environment than they did for their last release (an album largely created in a cabin in the Pocono Mountains), Good Old War managed to delve far deeper into the rootsy, organic sound they've carefully cultivated since forming from the ashes of Philadelphia indie-rock act Days Away. "When we play live, it's really natural and energetic and in your face," says guitarist/vocalist Dan Schwartz, who co-founded Good Old War in 2008 with Keith Goodwin (on vocals, guitar, and keys) and Tim Arnold (on drums, keys, accordion, and vocals). "With the new record we've found a way to capture that live feel like never before. So even though this one's got some heavier material, there's still something upbeat and joyous there."

Indeed, a bittersweet spirit instills much of Come Back as Rain, a record whose songs were partly inspired by "that longing for home that happens when you're away all the time," according to Goodwin. It's a rare band that can make a refrain like "I might be present for the end of the world" sound sunny and cheerful (as on the album's closing track), but Good Old War's gently uptempo rhythms and high harmonies have an uncanny way of maintaining a bright and buoyant mood without ever coming off as cloying. From the lead-off single "Calling Me Names" (a lovesick kiss-off laced with intricate guitar hooks) to "Better Weather" (a clap-along-worthy paean to embracing optimism against all odds) to "It Hurts Every Time" (a steel-guitar-kissed footstomper about an endlessly disappearing lover), Good Old War seems sweetly devoted to keeping the faith in the face of heartache. One of the most heart-tuggingly hopeful songs on Come Back as Rain, the epic yet ethereal "Amazing Eyes" blends soaring vocals with gracefully strummed guitars and warm piano chords to stunning effect.

From start to finish, Come Back as Rain bears a rousing intensity that will certainly be familiar to anyone who's witnessed their live show. Thanks to crowd-ruling sets delivered while opening for the likes of Alison Krauss, Dr. Dog, Guster, Brandi Carlile, Joshua Radin, Gomez, and Xavier Rudd, the band garnered a considerable following that helped their second record to debut at #2 on Billboard's New Artist chart (as well as climb to the top slot on Amazon.com and on iTunes' Singer/Songwriter chart). Last spring, Good Old War widened that fan base by giving a muchtalked-about performance at the 2011 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. "We were playing first on Sunday, at about 11 in the morning," Goodwin recalls. "On the way there we were thinking, 'Aww, man—I hope people show up.' And then we started playing and we looked out into the crowd, and it's pretty packed and everyone just seemed pumped."

In addition to honing those increasingly famed performance chops, Good Old War continually refines their sound by exploring a dizzying range of music genres. "Tim listens to a ton of electronic music, and Keith is really into composers like Cole Porter," says Schwartz. "I'm more of a classic-rock guy, but we've all got an affinity for bands with a really strong focus on melodies, like the Beach Boys, the Beatles, Simon & Garfunkel, and Crosby, Stills and Nash." But despite the diversity of influences on their songwriting, Good Old War purposely kept performances stripped-down and studio-flourish-free on Come Back as Rain. "For us, one of the most important things about the band is we can walk into any room and perform all our songs with only our voices and guitars," says Schwartz. "And even though it's acoustic, it's not your typical folky kind of act—we're here to make people dance and feel good and just have a really fun time."
Twin Bandit
Twin Bandit
Something very special happened one day, two years ago in the kitchen of Vancouver's St. James Music Academy, a non-profit that nurtures the musical souls and tummies of neighboring inner city kids. Academy cook Hannah Walker was frazzled trying to prepare and serve a hundred quesadillas before the mad rush of children, and deal with a well-meaning, but untrained, volunteer. In a strange moment of serenity, she discovered that the greenhorn in question, Jamie Elliott, was her musical soulmate and would be her future counterpart in thefolk-Americana duo, Twin Bandit.On that day, Hannah and Jamie harmonized against the fevered pitch of stress and imminent chaos. With a few stolen moments, Hannah and Jamie began the adventure that would lead to their all-original folk-Americana duo, Twin Bandit. Now, they release their debut, For You(Nettwerk Music), resplendent with poignant lyrics and achingly gorgeous vocal harmonies.“It’s a profound and confusing time being a young adult, and there is something universal and timeless about folk music because it’s about life lessons likeforgiveness,having your heart broken or finally falling in love,” Hannah explains. “Telling and sharing stories is therapeutic.”At the core of the East Vancouver, British Columbia-based band’s aesthetic is the vocal harmony and spare instrumental accompaniment evocative of traditional American roots music. The day they met they sang almost every old chestnut they knew and excitedly rattled off favorite songs and artists from bygone eras. And yet if you listen closely, there are textures and nuances conjuring up contemporarysoundscapes and the weeping of pedal steel straight from traditional country.Both Jamie and Hannah grew up immersed in the rich heritage of American roots music. Prior to joining forces, Jamie had been playing in country and bluegrass bands for seven years, harmonizing with other female vocalists. Hannah grew up with five sisters, and has been singing with her siblings since before she can remember. Upon meeting, their connection was instant—like sisters and perfect creative counterparts—as both are equally strong instrumentalists, singers, songwriters, and co-songwriters. They’re twin creative souls with a compelling underpinning of darkness to their work, hence the name Twin Bandit.Within two months of their initial meeting, Hannah and Jamie were sitting
around a kitchen table piecing together the song that would become the stunning album track, “The Waltz.” They worked feverishly but quietly, keeping their burgeoning band private. In five months, they played their first show. A month later they played their record label audition and wowed Nettwerk Music with their stately sincerity and freshly reimagined take on well-worn but beloved musical traditions.For Youis a gracefully intimate album with raw emotionality, elegantly sparse musicianship, and mesmerizing vocal harmonies. Repeated listening sessions are rewarding as the listener hears such subtle touches as winsome pedal steel, Spaghetti Western-style atmospherics, and dreamy gospel organs.Hannah and Jamie are equal talents, and there is an uncanny cohesion toFor You. However, there are intriguing differences in the perspective of each writer’s lyrics. “I write from an inner struggle ordarkness, and Jamie writes from a sense of peace and optimism, even in difficult times,” Hannah explains.The breathtakingly bucolic “Tides” is an emotionally centered look into a tumultuous relationship. “It’s about love coming and going like tides and finding acceptance in that—like ‘if you love someone set them free,’” Jamie says. The graceful gait of “Rosalyn” belies the haunted quality of the lyrics with lines like—the tracks on your skin tell me how far you’ve been. “I wrote that for a dear friend who was older than me and struggled with addiction. I grew up hearing her stories and was touched by her as a person because she was so kind. It surprised me that someone with such a difficult life had so much love to offer,” Hannah reveals. Other album highlights include the high lonesome beauty of “The Waltz,” and the moony, “For You.” The album was produced by John Anderson, their good friend and in-demand pedal steel virtuoso, who intuitively understood their reach as traditionalists who want to keep the heritage alive.Up next, Twin Bandit plan to continue to support the St. James Music Academy—where their generous spirits met—as well as the Carnegie Community Centre, a facility that offersvarious social programs to one of the most in-need neighborhoods, the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, British Columbia. “Music is a tool to create social change. We strongly believe in the power of that message and want to play our part,” Hannah says
Venue Information:
Great Scott
1222 Commonwealth Avenue
Allston, MA, 02134
http://www.greatscottboston.com/