Marnie Stern

WZBC 90.3 FM 40th Anniversary Show

Marnie Stern

Speedy Ortiz, BOYTOY

Thu, November 7, 2013

Doors: 9:00 pm / Show: 9:30 pm

Great Scott

Allston, MA

$10 advance / $12 day of show

This event is 18 and over

Tickets available at TICKETMASTER.COM, or by phone at 800-745-3000. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at the Great Scott box office seven days a week 12PM-1AM, The Sinclair Box office Tuesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM. Please note: box offices are cash only.

Marnie Stern
Marnie Stern
There's little doubt that Marnie Stern lives up to her reputation as "the lady who shreds," but for Marnie, shredding is not enough. After putting out three critically-acclaimed albums, Marnie could have gotten away with putting out another album filled with her richly layered sound, singular frenetic finger tapping and almost philosophical lyrics. However, as anyone who has given her last few albums a good listen can tell, Marnie is not one to stand still. Instead she attacks her musical evolution with full frontal bravado, reveling in musical risk instead of relaxing in the comforts of the known. For Marnie, musical possibility drives her ambition.

Her new album, The Chronicles of Marnia, finds Marnie not only working with a new drummer (Oneida's Kid Millions), but also passionately subtracting from her normally dense song structures to craft a sound that is both familiar and wholly original. "I always gravitate towards interweaving and a more abrasive sound," Marnie said about working on the new album. "I was working with Nicholas Vernhes from Rare Book Room Recording in Brooklyn, and he was the producer. He wanted my voice clearer and fewer guitar parts. I tried it because I wanted to try something different."

Her trademark exuberant guitar work is still present, in fact, absent a few layers of grit, it's even more evident. "We stripped away a lot of the layers and a lot of unnecessary interweaving guitar parts. There's less clutter and more of staying on a part without adding too much instrumentation." Through the subtractive production process, Marnie's voice became more prominent, a fact that kind of concerns Marnie, "I get worried that I am coming across as someone who thinks they are a 'singer,' as opposed to my usual mishmash of voices that aren't always in key," she said about the album's more pronounced vocals. "I grapple with that attitude because I think it's important as a musician to try and be as proficient as possible, or try to put a lot of work into it. I suppose in my own way, I put a ton of time into singing and trying to find interesting melody ideas, I just never think of myself as having a 'nice' voice." It's an enervating change for an artist who in the past has always skillfully buried her vocals under the guitar and drum tracks.

The musical transformation evident on her new album isn't entirely unexpected, as fans who have listened to both "For Ash" and "Every Single Line Means Something" in a single sitting know. That same slow progression can be seen between 2010's self-titled album and the forthcoming The Chronicles of Marnia. Marnie can't help but laugh when thinking back on her musical evolution. "I'm sure if I went from the first album to this one, I'd have a heart attack. Luckily it's been gradual enough for me to enjoy the changes." And there's little doubt that her fans will too. Even as Marnie evolves from what Pitchfork called her "art-metal math-rock bubblegum pop" genre, fans will still find themselves jumping head first into the album and quickly bonding with the emotionally resonant material, cascading hooks and transcendental guitar riffs. Plus, the album shreds. She is Marnie Stern after all.
Speedy Ortiz
Speedy Ortiz
From their start as a full band, Speedy Ortiz found a warm reception in the Bay State’s rock underground, from Boston’s basements to Western Massachusetts’ experimental scene. In March 2012, the band recorded and self-released a two-song single (“Taylor Swift” / “Swim Fan”) with Paul Q. Kolderie (Pixies, Hole) and Justin Pizzoferrato (Chelsea Light Moving, Dinosaur Jr.). Establishing both creative momentum and a fanbase earned through near-constant U.S. touring, they continued with the Sports EP, a loosely conceptual 10” released on Exploding In Sound that June.
Their debut album Major Arcana, named Best New Music by Pitchfork, saw the evolution of Speedy Ortiz from a lo-fi project into a wholly collaborative effort, marked by Darl Ferm’s thick bass lines, drummer Mike Falcone’s boisterous fills, and the counterbalance between guitarist Matt Robidoux’s anti-melodic playing and frontwoman Sadie Dupuis’s angular riffing. The end result is a band able to distill their influences and impulses into something at once dissonant and melodic.
For their upcoming Real Hair EP, Speedy Ortiz has teamed up with Paul Q. Kolderie once again, resulting in a collection brushed with effected guitars and pop-conscious vocals. Here Dupuis attempts to untangle concerns about misrepresentation of identity in four songs delivered with the band’s signature abrasive clarity. The band will support the EP on the road into 2014 with a January southeastern string of All-Ages shows with Boston friends Grass is Green, their first European tour in February, and supporting slots with the Breeders and Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks.

With Real Hair, Speedy Ortiz once again taps into the four-part chemistry that brought their prior outings praise. They’re still equal parts noisy and poetic, and now merge those channels more seamlessly than ever.
BOYTOY
BOYTOY
BOYTOY is the love child of three dinguses from the same stardust.
Venue Information:
Great Scott
1222 Commonwealth Avenue
Allston, MA, 02134
http://www.greatscottboston.com/