Shigeto

Shigeto

Coralcola

Fri, October 27, 2017

Doors: 10:00 pm / Show: 10:30 pm

Great Scott

Allston, MA

$12 advance / $15 day of show

This event is 21 and over

Tickets available at AXS.COM, or by phone at 855-482-2090. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at the Great Scott box office seven days a week 12PM-1AM, or at The Sinclair Box Office (Cambridge, MA) Wednesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM. Please note: Great Scott box office is cash only.

Shigeto
Shigeto
The music of Zach Saginaw, who records as Shigeto, has always cross-wired of a host of different musical influences. His EPs Semi-Circle and What We Held Onto explored his grandmothers experience from a US internment camp through ambient, beat-driven tracks, using samples of his grandmothers voice. His debut album Full Circle was a culmination of these EPs, employing obsessive field recording and meticulous percussion to create sumptuous instrumental hip-hop. 2012s sophomore album Lineage was a musical journey through his heritage set to the sounds of jazz, hip-hop, funk and folk. And 2012’s No Better Time Than Now was an album about living in the moment, with songs that seemed to be harbingers of change and immediacy (“First Saturn Return,” “Soul Searching”).

On Intermission, Saginaw places all of those disparate sounds side by side, offering a snapshot both of where he has been as an artist, as well as where he is going. “Intermission grew out of the idea that I have all of these places I want to go; even though I’m not there yet, these are six little signposts along the way.” In the years since No Better Time Than Now, Shigeto’s experience as a musician has only deepened. He recorded tracks for the Detroit rapper ZelooperZ, and performed with jazz legend Dave Douglass’ High Risk

Project. “I couldn’t accept the fact that I was hanging,” he laughs. “I was like, wait, I dropped out of jazz school, how does this work?” “But what it did was make me realize that music is music—you don’t have to be a certain type of musician or trained in a certain way in order to contribute to something. It was very liberating.”

That sense of liberation comes through in every track on Intermission. It’s not electronic music, it’s not jazz, it’s not hip-hop—it’s all of those; “Pulse” blends glacial electronics with plinking vibraphones (“That song is kind of a dancefloor-type song, which is different for me,” Saginaw says). On the other end of the spectrum entirely are “Gently” and “Deep Breathing,” two moody, spacious, beat-less songs that spin soft strands of synth over empty air. Taken together, the songs tell the story of an artist with a broad musical background stretching out and exploring his influences. “When I’m having a lot of fun, that’s how I know when I’m on to something,” he says. “Like the first time you ever realized you could plug a microphone into your interface and record your own sounds, and your whole world was changed. Intermission is like that for me—its about getting that feeling again.”
Coralcola
A vehicle destroyed, a pizza delivery job terminated. EDM dilettantism and general disillusionment soaring at a fever pitch. For Mikey Lee, early 2008 resembled a topography of dark and untimely events, and the assemblage of lush, listless bedroom tunes was the most powerful antidote.

A point of return was realized in the eponymous track "Heath Ledger" -- an ode to troubled dynamism and superficial fascination in the wake of the subject's overdose. This attracted the attention of DJs Die Young and David Day, residents of the local electronic music fixture Basstown--and ultimately lead to a debut performance-- supporting Kompakt's techno-maestro The Field.

Mikey's DJ residences around Boston, just about an hour east of his hometown of Worcester, a dense cloud of blog-followers, and the self-released EP cassette "747" aggregated in a nomination for the Best Local Electronic/Dance Act of '09 in the Boston Phoenix, shows with Lymbyc System, Telefon Tel Aviv, and Small Black. The floodgates then opened gloriously for assimilation into the DIY basement party machine known as Big Digits with shows alongside Dan Deacon and Health.

With the arrival of the single EGGGIRL (ode to meme pinup EGGGIRL) in the Spring of 2010 and a slew of EPs and collaborations scheduled to materialize in 2010, the Coralcola forecast is bubbling and resolute. Mikey Lee's auratic quest pushes forward to future levels, propelled by the everyday sifting-through and plundering of fragments of popkultur, foliage and industrial detritus of Worcesterian suburbia.
Venue Information:
Great Scott
1222 Commonwealth Avenue
Allston, MA, 02134
http://www.greatscottboston.com/