Strike Anywhere

Strike Anywhere

Worriers, Rooftops

Mon, November 20, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

Great Scott

Allston, MA

$15

This event is 18 and over

Please note: This show was moved from The Middle East to Great Scott. Tickets originally purchased for the show at The Middle East will be refunded, and will not be honored at the new location.

Tickets available at AXS.COM, or by phone at 855-482-2090. No service charge on tickets purchased in person at the Great Scott box office seven days a week 12PM-1AM, or at The Sinclair Box Office (Cambridge, MA) Wednesdays-Saturdays 12-7PM. Please note: Great Scott box office is cash only.

Strike Anywhere
Strike Anywhere
Strike Anywhere is more than a band; Strike Anywhere is a movement, a sound and a force. The band’s incredibly solid career has spanned 15 years across the globe, releasing four critically acclaimed albums while remaining a staple in the underground music scene since their inception. Comprised of Thomas Barnett (vocals), Eric Kane (drums), Matt Smith (guitar), Mark Miller (guitar), and Garth Petrie (bass), Strike Anywhere is undoubtedly one of the most influential melodic hardcore bands of our time.

Formed in 1999 in Richmond, VA, Strike Anywhere has defied categorization and broken down walls of what it is to be punk. After their debut EP, Chorus of One, was released, Strike Anywhere teamed up with Jade Tree who issued Change Is a Sound in August 2001. The release of Exit English followed in 2003 and the rarities collection To Live in Discontent was released in January 2005. Strike Anywhere joined up with Fat Wreck Chords for their next full-length, the critically acclaimed Dead FM, which was released in June 2006 and saw the band touring the around world numerous times in support of the record.

Fast-forward to 2009 and Strike Anywhere had fragments of song ideas, melodies, guitar progressions, rhythms, and lyrics that they’d put together over the course of the three years ready to assemble an album. These ideas were put together while the band was spending time overseas living and working in a rehearsal built by the Prague Nomads, in Czech, outside of the city. There, the band did a lot of crucial writing and fine-tuning of their collection of new songs. Upon their return, Strike got together a few more times in Richmond, VA, in basements and warehouses to finish building what would become Iron Front. Vocalist Thomas Barnett said, “It’s interesting that we would have a lot of our writing time for the record done in Europe, because the LP title is a tribute and a homecoming of the Antifascist Circle's creators and original activists and creators of an international antifascist movement. They were Europeans who were trying to combat the rise of fascism in Central Europe in the early decades of the last century.” Strike Anywhere teamed up with Bridge Nine Records for the release of their most emotionally and politically charged album yet, Iron Front, which hit stores in October 2009.

Recorded by Brian McTernan at Salad Days in Baltimore, Iron Front packs the intensity and ferocity that Strike Anywhere had in their heads and hearts throughout the writing process. Barnett went on to say, “Brian was adamant that we retain the emotion and the impact of each song's potential - with soaring and organic anthemic highs and crunching, floor-shaking lows. The production aesthetic was relentless and magnetic and the songs were organized to build a narrative of impressions - the aggressive coupled with the hopeful. None of the cleaner, more translucent, sonic moments that were present on Dead FM seemed relevant to the trajectory of this record. It was the quickest and easiest recording we've ever done.”

While slightly heavier and noisier than their previous releases, Iron Front features accessible songs that address global and personal issues like human rights, war, politics, and police brutality. Iron Front has more “roots” – more hardcore breakdowns and rhythms, darker melodic textures and fast-paced punk songs that dominate the album. Strike Anywhere has pushed the boundaries of their sound on this album, with soaring choruses coupled with dissonant and angular guitars and percussion. Drums were poured over and guitars were powered up on this recording for a more visceral and physical approach.

With the momentum of recording still on the forefront, Strike Anywhere set out on the road upon leaving the studio in summer of 2009 for a U.S./Canadian jaunt with Propagandhi. That year the band also headlined the first official Bridge Nine Records Tour featuring then-labelmates Polar Bear Club, Crime In Stereo, and Ruiner. Strike then headed overseas for a month-long excursion through Europe.

More recently, Bridge Nine issued a live acoustic album by the band: In Defiance of Empty Times. Spanning their entire catalog, the record pulls from two different sets: a show in Rochester, NY, with labelmates Polar Bear Club, and a gig on the eve of the Occupy Movement in Richmond, VA, which benefitted the Industrial Workers of the World organization. As frontman Thomas Barnett puts it, "This is the riot folk for rioting folks."
Worriers
Worriers
Lauren Denitzio is a maven at writing pop-punk anthems. Playing music for over a decade —beginning with the New Brunswick punk band The Measure [sa]—we had yet to see what Denitzio could accomplish as a sole songwriter until recently. Worriers, the Brooklyn-based band fronted by Denitzio and joined by friends, has released the 7” “Past Lives” on No Idea Records in 2011, the 12” EP “Cruel Optimist” on Don Giovanni Records in 2013, as well as the 7” “Sinead O’Rebellion” on Yo-Yo Records in 2013. This summer, Worriers brings us their finest work to date, with Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! as producer, on their first full-length release Imaginary Life.

Being released by Don Giovanni Records, Imaginary Life is Denitzio’s first time single-handedly generating an entire record’s worth of material. Accompanied by Rachel Rubino (Each Other’s Mothers, Troubled Sleep) and John McLean (Dead Dog, Todd Killingz) on lead guitars, Audrey Zee Whitesides (Mal Blum, Little Waist) on bass, Mike Yannich (The Ergs) on drums, and Lou Hanman (Caves) on backing vocals, Denitzio also asked Laura Jane Grace to produce the record. Working with a woman producer, and someone who came from a DIY background, was crucial to Denitzio. Grace enthusiastically agreed and brought on Marc Hudson, Against Me!’s front-of-house sound person and tour manager, to engineer the record at his studio in Fenton, MI. Grace also took Worriers on a nine-day tour with Against Me! in February to become better acquainted with their sound. In the studio, the group worked meticulously on the tracks—even creating multiple versions of certain songs using Casio beats—to give them time to develop into exactly what they were looking to create.

“I was writing songs that had to do with moments in my life that only happened very briefly, or things that could have happened had things gone a little differently, both in positive and negative ways,” says Denitzio. “I don’t mean regrets, but how life could be entirely different if you make a couple of different choices.”

While Imaginary Life doesn’t stray too far from past Worriers’ releases, it resonates stronger than ever in both sound and message. It flows fittingly backwards, opening with “Jinx,” a softer song that barely hits the one-minute-mark. We are presented with what seems to be a reflection of the current state of life and a fear of change, how goods things have been and wanting to hold onto that. From here, the album cracks wide open into all that ever came before. “Glutton for Distance,” with it’s mathy guitar leads and overflowing lyrics, depicts the desire to sustain a long-distance relationship. In “Chasing,” there is a bit of a departure from what we’ve come to know of Worriers; it’s pop beat is reminiscence of something we’d hear on the radio rather than at a punk show. It’s unexpected but natural, juxtaposed to dark lyrics about giving into unrequited love and carried along by Denitzio’s polished vocals. In the resolute political ballad ”They / Them / Theirs” we are questioned regarding notions of the gender binary and the frustrations that come with it. “Plans” and “Most Space,” two of the catchiest songs on Imaginary Life, are reminders of what tripped us up over Denitzio’s songwriting in the first place—fast and infectious guitars, anthemic lyrics, and unyielding vocals that Worriers never fails to provide.
Rooftops
Rooftops
In the far northwest corner of Washington State, nestled in the trees, between the mountains and the bay, is the city of Bellingham and the home of Rooftops. With Drew Fitchette, Mark Detrick, and Jonathan McIntyre on guitar and Wendelin Wohlgemuth on drums, Rooftops craft intricate, mathy pop rock with reticular instrumentation and sparse vocals, heavily influenced by the Chicago and Pittsburg indie scenes of the mid to late 90’s. Formed in the early summer of 2007, Drew, Mark, and Wendelin set out with the unifying goal of writing music that they enjoyed playing as well as listening to. Fostering fires of biophillic fervor, fastidiously felt in the furtive furrows of their furnace hearts, they eschewed the aid of aberrant effects pedals, the gratuity of guitar picks; with strings and sticks manipulated only by sinew and skin, they quickly developed a repertoire of challenging songs. Always adaptive, the band continued hone their sound; constantly playing shows and recording countless basement demos, eventually finding their missing piece in long time friend Jonathan McIntyre. With the addition of Jonathan, the band added a third guitar (yes, third guitar) and awoke three accompanying voices, cementing their evolution from instrumental movement to song. The two songs presented here represent the vestigial remnants of an earlier epoch in the Rooftops lineage: they are the final songs recorded as an instrumental three piece, preserved for posterity and serving as the always and ultimately relevant reminder of their evolutionary environment.
Venue Information:
Great Scott
1222 Commonwealth Avenue
Allston, MA, 02134
http://www.greatscottboston.com/